MAHASATIPATTHANA SUTTA PDF

There the Bhagava addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "O Bhikkhus," and they replied to him, "Venerable Sir. That [6] is the practice of the four methods of Steadfast Mindfulness. What are the four? The bhikkhu keeps his mind steadfastly on sensation, [13] with diligence, comprehension and mindfulness, thus keeping away covetousness and distress.

Author:Faelrajas Goltilkis
Country:Martinique
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Music
Published (Last):23 November 2015
Pages:298
PDF File Size:15.53 Mb
ePub File Size:2.86 Mb
ISBN:616-8-60427-649-8
Downloads:18803
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Gokus



Notes subscript numbers are explained in the endnotes to this book. In Roman script the following set of diacritical marks are used to indicate the proper pronunciation.

All the aspirated consonants are pronounced with an audible expulsion of breath following the normal unaspirated sound. To explore the truth about ourselves, we must examine what we are: body and mind. We must learn to observe these directly within ourselves. Therefore, in the same way as body and sensations cannot be experienced separately, the mind cannot be observed apart from the contents of the mind. For this reason the Buddha said:.

Unpleasant body sensation is related to pleasant sensation of the body, unpleasant sensation of the body, and attainment of fruition by strong dependence condition. The season or surrounding environment is related to pleasant sensation of the body, unpleasant sensation of the body, and attainment of fruition by strong dependence condition. Food is related to pleasant sensation of the body, unpleasant sensation of the body, and attainment of fruition by strong dependence condition.

Lying down and sitting i. There are four dimensions to our nature: the body and its sensations, and the mind and its contents. This exploration of truth will remove the delusions we have about ourselves. In the same way, to come out of the delusion about the world outside, we must explore how the outside world interacts with our own mind-and-matter phenomenon, our own self.

The outside world comes in contact with the individual only at the six sense doors: the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind. Since all these sense doors are contained in the body, every contact of the outside world is at the body level.

The traditional spiritual teachers of India, before the Buddha, in his day and afterwards, expressed the view that craving causes suffering and that to remove suffering one must abstain from the objects of craving. This belief led to various practices of penance and extreme abstinence from external stimuli. In order to develop detachment, the Buddha took a different approach.

If the sensation is pleasant we crave to prolong it, if it is unpleasant we crave to be rid of it. Dependent on the six sense-spheres, contact arises. Dependent on contact, sensation arises. Dependent on sensation, craving arises.

The immediate cause for the arising of craving and, consequently, of suffering is not something outside of us but rather the sensations that occur within us. However, merely to feel the sensations within is not enough to remove our delusions. We must directly experience anicca impermanence , dukkha suffering , and anatta selflessness within ourselves. Of these three, the Buddha always stressed the importance of anicca because the realization of the other two will easily follow when we experience deeply the characteristic of impermanence.

In one, Meghiya, who perceives impermanence, the perception of selflessness is established. Here several different starting points are explained: observing respiration, giving attention to bodily movements, etc. However, no matter from which point the journey starts, stages come which everyone must pass through on the way to the final goal.

They are:. In the colloquial language of the day, it also had the meaning of "knowingly. Meditators, there are three types of body sensations.

What are the three? Pleasant sensations, unpleasant sensations and neutral sensations. Sensations provide the nexus where the entire mind and body are tangibly revealed as impermanent phenomena, leading to liberation. Which four? Here, monks, a monk dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, 3 observing body in body, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter]; he dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, observing sensations in sensations, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter]; he dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, observing mind in mind, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter]; he dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, observing mental contents in mental contents, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter].

So sato va assasati, sato va passasati. Here a monk, having gone into the forest, or to the foot of a tree, or to an empty room, sits down cross-legged, keeps his body upright and fixes his awareness in the area around the mouth. With this awareness, he breathes in, with this awareness, he breathes out. Breathing in a deep breath, he understands properly: 5 "I am breathing in a deep breath.

Thus 6 he dwells observing body in body internally, or he dwells observing body in body externally, or he dwells observing body in body both internally and externally. Now his awareness is established: "This is body! This is how, monks, a monk dwells observing body in body. Again, monks, a monk while he is walking, understands properly: "I am walking"; while he is standing, he understands properly: "I am standing"; while he is sitting, he understands properly: "I am sitting"; while he is lying down, he understands properly: "I am lying down.

Thus he dwells observing body in body internally, or he dwells observing body in body externally, or he dwells observing body in body both internally and externally. Thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of arising in the body, thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of passing away in the body, thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of arising and passing away in the body. In this way he dwells detached, without clinging towards anything in the world [of mind and matter].

Again, monks, a monk, while going forward or backward, he does so with constant thorough understanding of impermanence; 11 whether he is looking straight ahead or looking sideways, he does so with constant thorough understanding of impermanence; while he is bending or stretching, he does so with constant thorough understanding of impermanence; whether wearing his robes or carrying his bowl, he does so with constant thorough understanding of impermanence; whether he is eating, drinking, chewing or savouring, he does so with constant thorough understanding of impermanence; while attending to the calls of nature, he does so with constant thorough understanding of impermanence; whether he is walking, standing, sitting, sleeping or waking, speaking or in silence, he does so with constant thorough understanding of impermanence.

Again, monks, a monk reflects on this very body, that is covered with skin and full of impurities of all kinds from the soles of the feet upwards and from the hair of the head downwards, considering thus: "In this body, there are hairs of the head, hairs of the skin, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, marrow, kidney, heart, liver, pleura, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its contents, faeces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal mucus, synovial fluid and urine.

Just as if there were a double-mouthed provision bag, full of various kinds of grains and seeds, such as hill-paddy, paddy, mung-beans, cow-peas, sesame seeds and husked rice, and as if there were a man with discerning eyes, who, after having opened that bag would examine the contents, saying: "This is hill-paddy, this is paddy, these are mung-beans, these are cow-peas, these are sesame seeds and this is husked rice"; in this same way, monks, a monk reflects on this very body, that is covered with skin and full of impurities of all kinds from the soles of the feet upwards and from the hair of the head downwards, considering thus: "In this body, there are hairs of the head, hairs of the skin, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, marrow, kidney, heart, liver, pleura, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its contents, faeces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal mucus, synovial fluid and urine.

Again, monks, a monk reflects on this very body, however it is placed or disposed, considering it according to the characteristic of each element: "In this body, there is the earth-element, the water-element, the fire-element and the air-element.

Just as if, monks, a skilful cow-butcher or his apprentice, after having slaughtered a cow and having divided it into portions, would sit down at the junction of four roads; in the same way, monks, a monk reflects on this very body, however it is placed or disposed, considering the material elements: "In this body, there is the earth-element, the water-element, the fire-element and the air-element.

Again, monks, a monk, when he sees a dead body that has been thrown in a charnel-ground, dead for one, two or three days, swollen, blue and festering, regarding his own body considers thus: "Indeed, this body is of the same nature, it will become like that and cannot escape it. Again, monks, a monk, when he sees a dead body that has been thrown in a charnel-ground, being eaten by crows, being eaten by vultures, being eaten by falcons, being eaten by herons, being eaten by dogs, being eaten by tigers, being eaten by leopards, being eaten by jackals and being eaten by different kinds of creatures, regarding his own body considers thus: "Indeed, this body is of the same nature, it will become like that and cannot escape it.

Again, monks, a monk, when he sees a dead body that has been thrown in a charnel-ground, reduced to a skeleton with some flesh and blood attached to it and held together by tendons, regarding his own body considers thus: "Indeed, this body is of the same nature, it will become like that and cannot escape it.

Again, monks, a monk, when he sees a dead body that has been thrown in a charnel-ground, reduced to a skeleton without any flesh but smeared with blood and held together by tendons, regarding his own body considers thus: "Indeed, this body is of the same nature, it will become like that and cannot escape it.

Again, monks, a monk, when he sees a dead body that has been thrown in a charnel-ground, reduced to a skeleton without any flesh or blood, held together by tendons, regarding his own body considers thus: "Indeed, this body is of the same nature, it will become like that and cannot escape it. Again, monks, a monk, when he sees a dead body that has been thrown in a charnel-ground, reduced to disconnected bones, scattered in all directions, here a bone of the hand, there a bone of the foot, here a bone of the ankle, there a bone of the knee, here a bone of the thigh and there a bone of the pelvis, here a bone of the spine, there a bone of the back, again there a bone of the shoulder, here a bone of the throat, there a bone of the chin, here a bone of the teeth and there a bone of the skull, regarding his own body considers thus: "Indeed, this body is of the same nature, it will become like that and cannot escape it.

Again, monks, a monk, when he sees a dead body that has been thrown in a charnel-ground, reduced to bleached bones of conch-like colour, regarding his own body considers thus: "Indeed, this body is of the same nature, it will become like that and cannot escape it.

Again, monks, a monk, when he sees a dead body that has been thrown in a charnel-ground, of bones that are piled up in a heap more than a year old, regarding his own body considers thus: "Indeed, this body is of the same nature, it will become like that and cannot escape it. Again, monks, a monk, when he sees a dead body that has been thrown in a charnel-ground, the bones having rotted away to powder, regarding his own body considers thus: "Indeed, this body is of the same nature, it will become like that and cannot escape it.

Here, monks, a monk, while experiencing a pleasant sensation, understands properly, "I am experiencing a pleasant sensation"; while experiencing an unpleasant sensation, he understands properly, "I am experiencing an unpleasant sensation"; while experiencing a neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant sensation, he understands properly, "I am experiencing a neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant sensation.

Thus he dwells observing sensations in sensations internally, or he dwells observing sensations in sensations externally, 13 or he dwells observing sensations in sensations both internally and externally. Thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of arising in sensations, thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of passing away in sensations, thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of arising and passing away in sensations.

Now his awareness is established: "This is sensation! This is how, monks, a monk dwells observing sensations in sensations. Thus he dwells observing mind in mind internally, or he dwells observing mind in mind externally, or he dwells observing mind in mind both internally and externally.

Now his awareness is established: "This is mind! This is how, monks, a monk dwells observing mind in mind. Here, monks, a monk dwells, observing mental contents in mental contents, as regards the five hindrances. How, monks, does a monk dwell, observing mental contents in mental contents, as regards the five hindrances? Here, monks, a monk, whenever sense desire is present in him, he understands properly that, "Sense desire is present in me. He understands properly, how sense desire that has now arisen in him, gets eradicated.

He understands properly, how sense desire that has now been eradicated, will in future no longer arise in him. Whenever aversion is present in him, he understands properly that, "Aversion is present in me. He understands properly, how aversion that has now arisen in him, gets eradicated. He understands properly, how aversion that has now been eradicated, will in future no longer arise in him.

Whenever sloth and torpor are present in him, he understands properly that, "Sloth and torpor are present in me. He understands properly, how sloth and torpor that have now arisen in him, get eradicated. He understands properly, how sloth and torpor that have now been eradicated, will in future no longer arise in him.

Whenever agitation and remorse are present in him, he understands properly that, "Agitation and remorse are present in me. He understands properly, how agitation and remorse that have now arisen in him, get eradicated. He understands properly, how agitation and remorse that have now been eradicated, will in future no longer arise in him.

Whenever doubt is present in him, he understands properly that, "Doubt is present in me. He understands properly, how doubt that has now arisen in him, gets eradicated. He understands properly, how doubt that has now been eradicated, will in future no longer arise in him. Thus he dwells observing mental contents in mental contents internally, or he dwells observing mental contents in mental contents externally, or he dwells observing mental contents in mental contents both internally and externally.

Thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of arising in the mental contents, thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of passing away in the mental contents, thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of arising and passing away in the mental contents. Now his awareness is established: "These are mental contents!

This is how, monks, a monk dwells observing mental contents in mental contents as regards the five hindrances. Again, monks, a monk dwells, observing mental contents in mental contents, as regards the five aggregates of clinging. How, monks, does a monk dwell, observing mental contents in mental contents, as regards the five aggregates of clinging?

Here, monks, a monk [understands properly]: "Such is matter, such is the arising of matter, such is the passing away of matter; such are sensations, such is the arising of sensations, such is the passing away of sensations; such is perception, such is the arising of perception, such is the passing away of perception; such are reactions, such is the arising of reactions, such is the passing away of reactions; such is consciousness, such is the arising of consciousness, such is the passing away of consciousness.

This is how, monks, a monk dwells observing mental contents in mental contents as regards the five aggregates of clinging.

Again, monks, a monk dwells, observing mental contents in mental contents, as regards the six internal and external sense spheres. How, monks, does a monk dwell, observing mental contents in mental contents, as regards the six internal and external sense spheres? Here, monks, a monk understands properly the eye, he understands properly the visible object and he understands properly the bondage that arises dependent on these two.

DV01 CALCULATION PDF

Satipatthana Sutta

Notes subscript numbers are explained in the endnotes to this book. In Roman script the following set of diacritical marks are used to indicate the proper pronunciation. All the aspirated consonants are pronounced with an audible expulsion of breath following the normal unaspirated sound. To explore the truth about ourselves, we must examine what we are: body and mind. We must learn to observe these directly within ourselves. Therefore, in the same way as body and sensations cannot be experienced separately, the mind cannot be observed apart from the contents of the mind. For this reason the Buddha said:.

AFR 900-3 PDF

Translator's Introduction

This version of the text might be out of date. Please click here for more information. The word "satipatthana" is the name for an approach to meditation aimed at establishing sati, or mindfulness. The term sati is related to the verb sarati, to remember or to keep in mind. It is sometimes translated as non-reactive awareness, free from agendas, simply present with whatever arises, but the formula for satipatthana doesn't support that translation. Non-reactive awareness is actually an aspect of equanimity, a quality fostered in the course of satipatthana.

ANTIGONE BY SOPHOCLES TRANSLATED BY ROBERT FAGLES PDF

VIPASSANA PRODUCTS

Join us weekly for live Dhamma Story Time sessions. Vipassana , which means to see things as they really are, is one of India's most ancient techniques of meditation. More information about Vipassana as taught by S. Goenka is available at www. The tag Vipassana identifies products that are directly related to this tradition and differentiates them from other Theravada resources available on our site.

Related Articles