DUB SOUNDSCAPES AND SHATTERED SONGS PDF

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :.

Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Dub by Michael E. Dub is a sub-genre of Jamaican reggae that flourished during reggae's "golden age" of the late s through the early s. Dub involves remixing existing recordings--electronically improvising sound effects and altering vocal tracks--to create its unique sound. Just as hip-hop turned phonograph turntables into musical instruments, dub turned the mixing and sound processing technologies of the recording studio into instruments of composition and real-time improvisation.

In addition to chronicling dub's development and offering the first thorough analysis of the music itself, author Michael Veal examines dub's social significance in Jamaican culture.

He further explores the "dub revolution" that has crossed musical and cultural boundaries for over thirty years, influencing a wide variety of musical genres around the globe. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published April 1st by Wesleyan University Press.

More Details Original Title. Other Editions 2. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Dub , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Apr 11, Sheehan rated it it was amazing. So basically I danced all around dub for years chasing dancehall from NYC hip-hop, reggae, ska and rocksteady from dancehall, and never really hitting unto the dub sounds until the late 's.

And then my world opened up, the Blood and Fire label was reissuing so many masters of dub, my homeboy Dan turned me on to King Tubby, and well really from then on, I pretty much found my heart in the rockers-era Waterhouse sounds of Jamaican Dub.

Oh I see everything in relation to dub now, the compositional insertions, mood-shifts of the dub versions, and most importantly, what is said in the absences and pauses. The power of silence was something that really resonated in that time of my life, as I was transitioning from a youngster full of political hubris and eager to speak on it, to a more moderated mature ing adult who saw the gravity of sometimes NOT needing to say something.

Of course, now it's like the old Tootsie Roll ads, where everything the kid sees turns into a tootsie roll. That's my life now, everything I hear, I see dub, I see pastiche and hear the versions that could be made from the source material. My lifestyle now reflects this, sometimes I stand back and let the rhythm of the scene ride on without comment, sometimes I shout down nonsense, sometimes I repeat myself So this book is amazing in part because it not only provides a great history of dub, with good primary source interviews, it also contextualizes dub as helping create a meta-history of post-modern blackness that creates a referent point for reflection beyond just the auditory.

Something that ties together American Soul to Reggae to Dancehall to hip-hop to electronica to ambient to jungle, ad infinitum The deconstructive process of the music gets reified in so many of the forms that succeed it.

Great musical history, a bit academic for those put off by critical theory, but really well thought out and researched, a great addition to the canon of literature on Jamaican music. Sep 20, Ray rated it it was amazing. One of the best researched books about reggae ever! Despite its limited title, it is a well written history of reggae without rehashing material form other books on reggae.

Of course the focus is on dub. This book provides more detail than I'd ever hoped for- even the details of the specific and recording techniques used in mixing dub tracks.

The author also covers the historical and sociological influences on dub and its assimilation into music of many cultures. I most enjoyed the features on s One of the best researched books about reggae ever! I most enjoyed the features on specific engineers, who are rarely credited for their innovations. The author cites specific a and b-sides of singles to describe what makes each engineer unique.

I found most of the tracks on Rdio and YouTube. Mar 25, Brian rated it really liked it. Instead of being a tabloid-style tell-all like most other books about music, this book tells the story of dub with a strong emphasis on musicology.

It does get a little pedantic toward the end, but not before giving the reader the tools to listen to and understand dub with a greater appreciation for the environment that inspired it, the artists that pioneered it, and the techniques that made it come alive-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live..

It does get a little pedantic toward the end, but not before giving the reader the tools to listen to and understand dub with a greater appreciation for the environment that inspired it, the artists that pioneered it, and the techniques that made it come alive-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live-live Aug 05, Jesse rated it really liked it.

Clear-headed academic overview of dub. The writing isn't enthralling, but it's not supposed to be. Wish it had recommended playlists. View 2 comments. Aug 16, Spencer rated it liked it. This was an extraordinarily well-researched book by an author with unquestioned credentials as a musical historian and scholar. Unfortunately, the rather compelling histories of Dub's origins, context and key players were offset by an overly academic analysis of its impact.

I never expected a book ostensibly about music to be so riddled with scholarly references to hyphenated-last-name "thinkers" or the "cross-cultural renegotiation of our understanding of modernity. Still, I don't mean to hate. It's clear from the author's introduction that this is a personal music to him -- one that grabbed his attention immediately and held it with sufficient vigor to create this extremely thorough review.

And I greatly appreciate the new understanding I have gained about the specific personalities involved in the genesis and proliferation of the music, the details of the equipment and studios being used to create it, and the context in which Dub was played in Jamaica and abroad.

I also appreciate the effort in linking Dub to the other styles of music it influenced, but I had hoped for more causal and direct links rather than theorized and abstract ones. The author takes pains to mention that there has never before been a book dedicated solely to the genre of Dub, and I am very grateful that the subject has been taken up and that this book exists.

I suppose that I had just hoped that the first volume on the subject would be a pure history, concerned more with chronicling the who, what, when, where and how of the music rather than using it as a launching point for a pedantic examination of its social and cultural implications.

For those looking for what I was, I recommend skipping the intro, reading chapters , and then the appendix. Jun 21, Colin Masso rated it it was amazing.

This book had much to say on the techniques used to create some of the most distinctive soundscapes in recorded music. It also had much to say on the impact that Dub has had on a plethora of music that followed it. However, it kind of glossed over that part, in my opinion. The reason that I think those two artists in particular were important to have brought up, is that their influence from Du This book had much to say on the techniques used to create some of the most distinctive soundscapes in recorded music.

The reason that I think those two artists in particular were important to have brought up, is that their influence from Dub was derived during its most fertile period. Certainly Veal covers the far-reaching influence of the genre after its decline and transformation into Raga and Dancehall, but really missed out on what a fantastic influence it had in the early and mid seventies, as can be heard on recordings by Can, The Talking Heads, and Eno himself.

This music didn't really sound like Dub, but took to heart the creative process of playing the studio like an instrument, which to me is more interesting than music that is directly derivative. Jan 23, Graham rated it really liked it. Solid overview of dub that touches on musicology, history, and post-colonial theory to explain the style's prominence and lasting influence.

The only real issue I had with the book are the constant comparisons of songs with their dub remix versions, replete with blow-by-blow verbal descriptions of what's happening in the song, in technical musicologist terminology. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, though some of the language can get overwhelming to those inexperienced in this field, but to re Solid overview of dub that touches on musicology, history, and post-colonial theory to explain the style's prominence and lasting influence.

This isn't necessarily a bad thing, though some of the language can get overwhelming to those inexperienced in this field, but to really appreciate it one has to have access to both the songs described or it just ends up seeming a bit hard to grasp.

Aside from that, an excellent overview of a rarely-covered field of study. May 03, Joe rated it liked it. Some great bios and stories of the key players in dub are the highlight of this book. There are also some interesting ideas about connections between dub and other musical styles. All that being said, if I was on the thesis committee for this book, my red pen would have just about run out of ink.

I'm not against academic writing - this is just a potential diamond in the rough that needs much more polish to be clear. That being said, between some tips from this book, Internet searches, Pandora's Some great bios and stories of the key players in dub are the highlight of this book. That being said, between some tips from this book, Internet searches, Pandora's dub channel, and watching the film Rockers recommended , I've had an enjoyable, deeper excursion into the world of dub.

Jun 22, Darren Hemmings rated it it was amazing Shelves: music. If this is not the only book written about the dub artform then it is certainly the only one worth reading. Veal manages an expert dissection of the roots of dub, its development and critically its meaning to its practitioners and fans, without ever dropping into dry academic study or frothing hyperbole.

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Dub: Soundscapes and Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae

As befits a music invested in wiping itself away, the story of dub has been chronicled in an erratic fashion. Often cited as a precursor to just about everything musical since the s, dub nonetheless subsists officially in the form of footnotes: as an adjunct to reggae, as a foundation for techno and house, as the fundament of a remix culture so pervasive as to go almost unnoticed in the present day. Veal, an associate professor of music at Yale University, offers a corrective that focuses on dub as a distinct musical style, as well as a repository for extramusical ideas that incubate within its suggestive aural spaces. The first part of the book places the genre within the complex timeline of Jamaican music. With the birth of dub, producers and engineers began crafting alternate versions of popular reggae songs, remixing familiar riffs into decaying references and reducing melodic vocal lines to abstract dashes of echo and noise.

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A great read if you are interested in the more technical side of Jamaican music- which is actually pretty low-tech. But that is it's magic. The producers made the most out of very little and in many In early s Jamaica, Osbourne "King Tubby" Ruddock, Lee "Scratch" Perry, and several other engineers took recordings of popular reggae songs or rhythm tracks and applied such studio tricks as echo

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