ASTROLOGY OF PERSONALITY DANE RUDHYAR PDF

No part of this book may be reproduced by any mechanical, photographic or electronic process, or in the form of a photographic recording, nor may it be stored in a retrieval system, transmitted, translated into another language, or otherwise copied for public or private use, excepting brief passages quoted for purposes of review, without the permission of the publisher. The Astrology of Personality was first published in When this book was written, following a series of articles appearing in the magazine American Astrology which had just been published and edited by Paul Clancy, astrology interested relatively few people. It was associated in the public mind either with fortune-telling of the most superficial type, or with Rosicrucians, Theosophists, or Hermetists. The most well-known English astrologers, Sepharial and Alan Leo, had been occultists and Theosophists; and it was in such circles that I first heard of and studied astrology just fifty years ago. It occurred to me then that astrology could be used in close connection with depth- psychology if it were considered in a new light and if many of its basic concepts were reformulated so as to fit the mentality and the experiences of the modern men and women of our post-World War I society.

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No part of this book may be reproduced by any mechanical, photographic or electronic process, or in the form of a photographic recording, nor may it be stored in a retrieval system, transmitted, translated into another language, or otherwise copied for public or private use, excepting brief passages quoted for purposes of review, without the permission of the publisher.

The Astrology of Personality was first published in When this book was written, following a series of articles appearing in the magazine American Astrology which had just been published and edited by Paul Clancy, astrology interested relatively few people. It was associated in the public mind either with fortune-telling of the most superficial type, or with Rosicrucians, Theosophists, or Hermetists. The most well-known English astrologers, Sepharial and Alan Leo, had been occultists and Theosophists; and it was in such circles that I first heard of and studied astrology just fifty years ago.

It occurred to me then that astrology could be used in close connection with depth- psychology if it were considered in a new light and if many of its basic concepts were reformulated so as to fit the mentality and the experiences of the modern men and women of our post-World War I society.

I communicated my ideas to Paul Clancy whom I met in New York after corresponding with him for a couple of years, and he responded enthusiastically and offered to publish anything I wanted to write in his magazine.

A Psychological Section was started in the magazine, and I wrote at least two long articles every month. Later on I was asked by Grant Lewi to contribute to Horoscope —also two articles monthly—and other magazines followed suit as astrology grew in popularity. The popularization of astrology had important implications. What is your sign? There is not, however, only one kind of psychology; and so the psychological interpretation of the signs and the characterization of twelve zodiacal Types of human beings could develop at several levels.

Quite a few have followed my approach in which I have tried to combine depth-psychology and holistic philosophy both of which emphasize the integration of the personality together with some of the most revealing and fecund vistas of occultism and Oriental metaphysics. Today, thirty-five years later, as this book is about to reach a larger public, astrology faces a crisis; one might say a crisis in consciousness. This crisis is caused by the vast expansion of the interest in astrology, an interest which has touched both the new youth, and also college intellectuals.

They hope to find in astrology not only answers to their poignant personal problems but even more some sort of inner security. Many of them, having broken away from their family traditions and refusing to participate in a culture increasingly dominated by a dehumanized and de-natured approach to knowledge, to social organization, and to interpersonal relationships, long to discover their place and function in a more-than-human, universal or cosmic order.

However, there is another type of young people who are fascinated by science and technology, by computers and moonflights. They are often familiar with statistical techniques and all kinds of psychological tests. They are intellectually curious, ambitious and, even if they find fault with our society, they are eager to get to the top of the social and economic ladder.

They want to be progressive, future-oriented, builders of the glorious technological society which they see arising. To this science-oriented group the approach to astrology promoted by the Irish astrologer and scholar, Cyril Fagan, and popularized by his monthly articles in American Astrology for the last twenty years, has a great appeal.

It is Mr. He claims that the only true zodiac is the sidereal zodiac. The tropical zodiac is based on the apparent motion of the Sun in the sky from one vernal equinox to the next. It refers to the annual cycle of the ever- changing relationship of the earth-globe to the Sun, source of all energies on this earth—that is, to the cycle of the seasons. They did coincide at a time variously estimated from around B.

A great deal of confusion is thus created. But actually the issue goes deeper. What is at stake behind the controversy concerning the validity of a tropical or a sidereal zodiac is the basic attitude one takes toward astrology. The siderealist claims that it was born strictly as a science of observation, relating the coincidence between actual events on earth to such celestial phenomena as the appearances of stars at the horizon, planetary conjunctions, etc.

Gradually a body of classified recorded correlations would thus have been built in a true scientific manner. But confusion occurred in the first centuries A. This is not the place to discuss the validity of this siderealist picture, but it does not seem to accord with the way in which the archaic mind operated before, let us say, B.

The essential point, as I see it, is whether, considering astrology as such a kind of age-old empirical and essentially Events- Oriented science fills the psychological need of our present humanity-—the need which has made astrology so popular today. Because I do not believe that this type of astrology is what we need today, I have recently formed an International Committee of Humanistic Astrology I. This type of psychology is neither Freudian, nor Behavioristic or Clinical. For this reason it is also called Third Force psychology.

Such an astrology is not an empirical science. When I wrote The Astrology of Personality thirty-five years ago I was not quite aware of the problems that might confront the growth of astrology; and no one certainly expected that it would develop such a wide appeal to the modern mind. I still accepted some traditional concepts which even the pioneering mind of Marc Jones had taken for granted.

Astrology has been essentially geocentric, even if it accepted some ideas belonging to the heliocentric picture of the solar system. It is the way he orients himself to the universe as a whole that matters. In a deeper sense, he is the whole sky focused at a particular point of space-time. What differentiates him from other individuals is this particular space-time formula; what identifies him with every other being is that it is the same sky, the same Sun, Moon, planets and stars which constitute the substance of his being.

Form differentiates; substance unifies. Because my philosophical-cosmic and humanistic approach was not yet clearly defined in , and because I was influenced by beliefs and images belonging to the Theosophical-occult tradition, there are in this book quite a few interpretations and statements which I would not formulate today in the same way. A detailed revision of this large volume would consume more time and energy than I have at this late stage of my life.

Yet the constant demand for the book makes it imperative at this crucial time of the evolution of astrology that it should be spread widely through a paperback edition. I should mention, however, the change in my approach to the fundamental character of the natal Houses, and I have discussed the reasons for such a change in a number of more recent books and articles.

Everything is in movement; and astrology deals with time values, with cycles. This is true, yet there is also space; and I believe, that which remains constant in every human being. Every human being is born at the center of his own space; and it is that space to which the circle of houses refers.

Let me repeat that the purpose of this astro-psychology is to help the person to actualize this innate potential, to bring what is only possible to an at least relatively complete state of fulfillment. I now conceive the natal houses most definitely as degree sections of the space surrounding the natal act of individualization, i. The houses are not in the zodiac; but it is the signs of the zodiac and all celestial bodies which find their location in this or that house.

As a result, the Placidus system of house-determination, which is still mostly in use, does not fit in with such an approach, for it is based on a time-factor. The Campanus system, on the other hand, is a space-based method of calculating the longitude of the cusps of the house, and I am therefore using it and finding it more and more revealing in astro-psychological practice, even though it is certainly not the best possible system. It would substitute actual star- groups and their relative motions for the old type of zodiacal mythology that relies solely on pictorial and symbolic man-made constellations.

We may learn, of course, from the archaic past of humanity; but it should be the whole of humanity, including, for instance, the Chinese and Mayan cultures. Besides, it is my belief that each great culture inevitably develops its own approach to the universe, its own cosmology and astrology; and I do not see why our Western civilization, with its roots in the Greco-Latin and the Hebrew tradition, should not have developed its own approach to astrology.

This Western civilization may very well be nearing the end of its cycle, and I feel that both the protesting Hippie youth and the technologically oriented young college- graduates are contributing to a new civilization. Ever since I was sixteen years old my life has been polarized by an irrevocable decision to serve in any way I could the forces building such a new civilization.

I am using it as the philosopher Ian Smuts and the psychologist Carl Jung use it. Perhaps the following few sentences, which were included in the Prefaces of the first and second edition of this book, will make this point clear. Therefore it represents the wholeness of the human being as a microcosm; man as a whole solar system operating on the background of, and in constant relationship to the zodiac or the galaxy. When man becomes truly a microcosm, he demonstrates personality to the fullest extent and manifests as a living Person, or as a great Personage.

The goal of astrology is the alchemy of personality. It is to transform chaos into cosmos, collective human nature into individual and creative personality. I was myself lucky enough to read The Astrology of Personality for the first time nearly thirty years ago soon after I began seriously studying astrology in At that time my career could have gone in a number of different ways.

This book more than any other, convinced me that astrology was the subject to which I wanted to devote my life. It had exactly the same impact on my wife Suzi. Perhaps the central importance of this book is the very clear insight Rudhyar presents of the fundamental nature of astrology, and the importance he therefore places on an understanding of its symbolic and formal basis.

Rudhyar is never casual. Rudhyar develops this image to show how astrology like algebra binds together it symbolic elements, such as planets, zodiacal positions, parts, nodes, etc into a formula describing a living whole Whereas in algebra the symbolic elements refer to quantities in astrology they refer to qualities, to universal life qualities, to living processes on different levels from physical to spiritual.

How Rudhyar would have smiled, and at the same time been exasperated, at the continuing preoccupation with the need to make astrology jump through certain predetermined scientific and statistical hoops.

It would have confirmed him in his decision in to establish the International Committee for Humanistic Astrology. That is not to say that Rudhyar was entirely against the empirical method, for it clearly has an important place to play in the development of knowledge, his concern was that astrologers should realize that astrology belongs to a different level of knowledge.

Such an approach, rather than reducing an individual to character traits and life events, has the power to elevate us to a deeper understanding and appreciation of each unique facet of the diamond of life and our unique place in, and relationship to, the whole scheme of things. To those of us, myself included, who would argue that too slavish an adherence to such an approach, with its implications that we already know all that there is to be known about our symbolic system, Rudhyar could immediately point to the vast riches of still unexplored symbolic content that he was already actively advocating in this book which still remain but poorly understood or investigated.

How many astrologers as a matter of course use the planetary nodes? How many even now, post-Addey, regularly use aspects based on the numbers 5, 7, 9, and 11? How many have thought through the vast array of parts, worthy of Alfred Witte, that Rudhyar outlines?

I know of no other astrologer who sheds such penetrating insight and illumination on to the basic symbology of our art and craft. This book was very much the seed of so much that was to follow after in his astrological thinking. It was crucial to the 20th century re-vitalisation of astrology.

And whilst the extraordinary technological achievements of mankind during this century cannot be gainsaid, the regeneration of the astrological perspective at this time will be seen to have been as important an evolutionary step as any of these developments of our understanding of the material realm.

The world will find that it owes much to Dane Rudhyar, and not least to The Astrology of Personality. Charles Harvey, Easter Clancy was the great midwife of both popular and serious astrology in America during the s. This book developed directly out of those first essays.

First Section 1. Second Section 6. Though this phase may have lasted hundreds and thousands of years, it was preceded by other phases of perhaps greater significance; and the purpose of this book is to show that a new phase is just now beginning. Mankind is changing radically its outlook upon external nature—witness the startlingly new concepts of modern science concerning space, time, matter, and the universe.

The psychological outlook is being just as fundamentally transformed. Astrology reflects the quality of this meeting, interprets it in functions of actual behavior, gives it significance in both a very fundamental and a very practical way. Philosophy per se speculates about life and man.

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